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COVID-19 Community Support

It will be 7th May, another week locked down, before decisions are made, the general consensus seems to be that further restrictions will apply to many, although there may be a relaxation of certain activities applicable to some groups.

These are trying times and many of us are struggling to deal with isolation.
If you feel that you are affected by this i.e. getting food, medication or just someone to talk to, call the number below, there are many in the parish more than happy to help out. 

We are set up to provide support to members of the parish, If there is anything you want to ask that’s not on the list above feel free to ask and we will make the necessary arrangements to assist in any way we can. 
We have PPE to protect both you and the volunteers, so don’t afraid to call;

Contact Lyn Butt on 01264 737213 or email Linda.butt@gmail.com

Lyn

 

Helpful guidance

I have tried to unpick the government guidelines below in order to simplify what we have been asked to do so far.

Firstly who is at risk, well we are all at risk, but some groups are more at risk than others, if you fall in one of the first two groups below then please take note of the advice, you may need some additional help, don’t be afraid to ask

Who is clinically extremely vulnerable? (Shielded)

Expert doctors in England have identified specific medical conditions that, based on what we know about the virus so far, place someone at greatest risk of severe illness from COVID-19.

Clinically extremely vulnerable people may include the following people. Disease severity, history or treatment levels will also affect who is in the group.

  1. Solid organ transplant recipients.
  2. People with specific cancers:
    • people with cancer who are undergoing active chemotherapy
    • people with lung cancer who are undergoing radical radiotherapy
    • people with cancers of the blood or bone marrow such as leukaemia, lymphoma or myeloma who are at any stage of treatment
    • people having immunotherapy or other continuing antibody treatments for cancer
    • people having other targeted cancer treatments which can affect the immune system, such as protein kinase inhibitors or PARP inhibitors
    • people who have had bone marrow or stem cell transplants in the last 6 months, or who are still taking immunosuppression drugs
  3. People with severe respiratory conditions including all cystic fibrosis, severe asthma and severe chronic obstructive pulmonary (COPD).
  4. People with rare diseases and inborn errors of metabolism that significantly increase the risk of infections (such as Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), homozygous sickle cell).
  5. People on immunosuppression therapies sufficient to significantly increase risk of infection.
  6. Women who are pregnant with significant heart disease, congenital or acquired.

People who fall in this group should have been contacted to tell them they are clinically extremely vulnerable.

If you’re still concerned, you should discuss your concerns with your GP or hospital clinician.

If you fall into this category you must NOT come into contact with any other person outside of your household. 

Who is at increased risk requiring stringent social distancing measures?

(Self isolation)

This group includes those who are:

  • aged 70 or older (regardless of medical conditions)
  • under 70 with an underlying health condition listed below (ie anyone instructed to get a flu jab as an adult each year on medical grounds):
    • chronic (long-term) respiratory diseases, such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), emphysema or bronchitis
    • chronic heart disease, such as heart failure
    • chronic kidney disease
    • chronic liver disease, such as hepatitis
    • chronic neurological conditions, such as Parkinson’s disease, motor neurone disease, multiple sclerosis (MS), a learning disability or cerebral palsy
    • diabetes
    • problems with your spleen – for example, sickle cell disease or if you have had your spleen removed
    • a weakened immune system as the result of conditions such as HIV and AIDS, or medicines such as steroid tablets or chemotherapy
    • being seriously overweight (a body mass index (BMI) of 40 or above)
  • those who are pregnant

If you are in the above categories you need to restrict contact with anyone outside of your household.

Social distancing (all of us!)

When am I allowed to leave the house?

You should only leave the house for very limited purposes:

  • shopping for basic necessities, for example food and medicine, which must be as infrequent as possible
  • one form of exercise a day, for example a run, walk, or cycle - alone or with members of your household
  • any medical need, including to donate blood, avoid or escape risk of injury or harm, or to provide care or to help a vulnerable person
  • travelling for work purposes, but only where you cannot work from home
  • You can leave home for medical appointments.
  • GP practices may postpone non-urgent health checks or routine appointments.
  • You should go to the doctor if there is an essential medical need.

Can I walk my dog / look after my horse?

Yes – provided it is alone or with members of your household.

People must stay at home as much as possible to reduce the spread of the virus. But you can also still go outside once a day for a walk, run, cycle. When doing this you must minimise the time you are out of your home and stay at least two metres away from anyone else that isn’t from your household.

Can I see my friends?

We must all stay away from each other to stop spreading the virus, and that means you should not be meeting friends unless you live in the same household.

Instead, you could keep in touch with your friends using phone or video calls.

Can I visit elderly relatives?

No, you should not be visiting family members who do not live in your home.

You should keep in touch with them using phone or video calls.

Where your relatives are elderly or vulnerable, you may leave your house to help them, for example by dropping shopping or medication at their door. You can also help them to order online.

Can I go out to help a vulnerable person?

You can only provide support to vulnerable people if you fulfil all of the conditions below:

  • you are well and have no symptoms like a cough or high temperature and nobody in your household does
  • you are under 70
  • you are not pregnant
  • you do not have any long-term health conditions that make you vulnerable to coronavirus

If the answer is yes to everything above, you may leave your house to provide care or to help a vulnerable person.

Welcome to Vernham Dean Community Support